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This Week’s Rebel With a Cause is Will Shortz

 

We typically think of rebels as people who refuse allegiance to, resist or rise up in arms against their governments. But a true rebel stands up for what he or she believes is right, not against what’s right. It’s about being an individual, upholding your principles and refusing to simply follow a crowd or let others force you to think and act the same way they do. Rebels are often trendsetters, innovators, trailblazers, thought leaders, change-agents.

In CUNY Baccalaureate, each student designs his or her own major guided by at least one faculty mentor. This is CUNY’s most innovative and flexible degree where students have access to courses across the entire university and they take on a major share of the responsibility for planning and carrying out their studies.

Because our students are taking “the road less traveled” by designing their own degrees, we’ve come to think of them as rebels, in the very best sense of the word. Accordingly, we’d like to tip our hat to other rebels who match our students’ tenacity and ambition.

This week’s “Rebel With a Cause” is enigmatologist Will Shortz, the world’s only academically accredited puzzle master. He designed his own major at Indiana University, graduating in 1974 with a one-of-a-kind degree in Enigmatology, the study of puzzles.

Will ShortzIf you don’t recognize his name, you might be familiar with his work if you crosswords or Sudoku puzzles.

Mr. Shortz has been the puzzle master for NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday since the program’s start in 1987, crossword editor of The New York Times since 1993, editor of Games magazine for 15 years, and the founder and director of the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament, held annually since 1978. He also founded the World Puzzle Championship in 1992 and co-founded the World Puzzle Federation in 1999.

He sold his first puzzle professionally when he was just 14 years old to a youth magazine. At age 16, he became a regular contributor to Dell puzzle publications. To date he is the author or editor of more than 500 puzzle books.

Mr. Shortz entered law school at the University of Virginia straight from college. His plan was to earn the law degree and practice law for ten years. By then he estimated he would make enough money to retire and do what he really wanted—create puzzles.

He did earn the degree but right after that, he skipped the bar exam and began his career in puzzles.

Mr. Shortz relishes his position at The Times. He believes the publication garners the most intelligent, educated group of solvers in the country. This allows him to presume a level of culture and solving skill that he could not anyplace else.

He has made some modest but important modifications to the daily Times puzzles. Constructor bylines were added; previously the contributors were anonymous. He had the puzzles become increasingly harder each day of the week to provide something for every skill level. Finally, the cultural references were broadened to include movies, television and rock music.

He made the crossover from word puzzle to number puzzles soon after the Japanese puzzle Will ShortzSudoku became an international hit in 2005; with his longtime crossword publisher, St. Martin’s, Mr. Shortz has a 50-book Sudoku series that has sold over 5 million copies.

Mr. Shortz wrote the riddles for the film Batman Forever and has guest-starred in episodes of The Simpsons and How I Met Your Mother, in each case playing himself. He was also the subject of the 2006 award-winning documentary film Wordplay.

An avid table tennis player, he is the owner and director of the Westchester Table Tennis Center in Pleasantville, NY, the largest table tennis facility in the United States. He also happens to own the world’s largest puzzle library, numbering over 25,000 puzzle books and magazines dating back to 1533!

We salute Mr. Shortz as a rebel who designed his own degree and had the courage to forsake a traditional path so he could follow his passion.

You Can Be A Rebel With a Cause, Too!Find out how to design your own degree in NYC.

11 Tips to Finance Your College Education

 

11 Tips for All Ages to Help You Finance Your College Education

Apply for financial aid.

Even if you don’t think you'll qualify, fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. You may be pleasantly surprised with the result.

Apply for national grants.

Options include Pell Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants and National SMART Grants.

ScholarshipsApply for local scholarships.

Civic organizations and religious institutions often have meaningful amounts of aid to dole out.

Cast a wide net...and bargain.

Applying to plenty of schools means a better chance of getting into more than one; getting into more than one translates to a higher likelihood of receiving a big financial aid package. Even schools that only provide need-based aid sometimes come up with drastically different offers. If you have more than one package on the table, you may be able to negotiate a better deal at your top choice college.

Find an official benefactor.

AmeriCorps, Peace Corps, National Health Services Corps and ROTC programs offer college money in exchange for a service commitment.

Look abroad.

Tuition and fees at U.S. private four-year colleges and universities now averages $27,293. At Scotland’s St. Andrews, the alma mater of Britain’s Prince William and wife Kate, U.S. students pay only $21,650; Canada's McGill University charges just $17,400 for Americans studying for a B.A.community college

Start at a community college.

Starting out at a low-cost community college and transferring to a four-year college for the final two years will wipe away a hefty chunk of tuition.

Apply to your in-state college.

Every state in the U.S. has a system of public higher education. As a state resident, you'll pay a lower rate for tuition than a non-reisdent will. If you are looking at public colleges and universities in other states, find out what you can do to establish residency there first to take advantage of the in-state tuition rate.tax break

Take advantage of tax breaks.

The American Opportunity Tax Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit are two excellent options.

Ask a guidance counselor.

If you're a high school student or recent HS graduate, don't forget to consult your local expert -- guidance counselors are often aware of options you may not have considered; best of all, their help is free.

Get college credit for your life experience.

Adults who have worked, served as volunteers, or taken classes at non-accredited organizations may have learned enough through those experiences to demonstrate the equivalent of college level learning. Many colleges offer life experience credits that help shortent the distance between you and a college degree, which will lower the cost of attendance.

If you find that last tip intriguing, you are not alone. Earning college credit for life experience has been featured in The New York Times Education Section and other publications. It is a valid, rewarding way to make significant progress toward earning the college degree. We've put together an overview of what the process typically entails; click here to learn more:

Find Out How the Life Experience Portfolio Process Works

College Is Not Just for Kids Anymore

 

by Marcia Y. Cantarella, Ph.D, President, Cantarella Consulting

People think of education as something the young engage in, but education is right at any age. Obviously, kindergarten through high school are years of education for the young. College years can be a time of transition between adolescence and adulthood, especially if you're between the ages of 17 and 21. However, changes in the workplace landscape have meant that the skills once adequate from a high school degree are no longer the skills that will allow for advancement today. Employers are looking for those with college degrees. That means that more people than ever are entering college -- as adults. That could be you.

adult returning studentYou would be in the category of adult learner. You may be older than the traditional student and have family and home responsibilities to manage. Your time is precious. At some point you realized that to progress in your work or to move to a more lucrative field, you need a college degree or more specific training in a specific arena. Perhaps you felt long ago that you weren't ready for or did not need college, or now you're dead-ended in a career and need to develop new skills. You are part of a large and growing group for whom increasing resources are available.

It has been noted that returning students are more focused and harder working and often do better, so many colleges are coming to value them greatly. In some ways I was an adult learner myself. I had a college degree and a successful corporate career but when I made the decision to move to higher education I was 40 and needed to earn a doctorate to advance in my field. So at age 40 I was the oldest kid in my graduate school class. But I also had a family and a job.

Part of what worked for me was having a clear sense of why I was doing what I was doing. That is part of the challenge for students going back to school. You do not want to feel you are wasting time and want to get what you need and then get on with it. But the reality is that you may not recognize that the skills that you need will come disguised in many forms. You may need specific skills such as financial management if that is the field you seek. But you will also need broad skills that will carry you to and through the many opportunities you could have along the way. The broad skills are communications (written and verbal), critical adult returning studentthinking/problem-solving, research and the ability to work well with others. Those skills emerge in the classes many think are a waste. They will be found in English (think communications), Philosophy (think about thinking), History (think about research) or Social Science classes (think about human behavior). They will be found in the papers you research and write for any class or the team projects you have to do. They are the skills employers are seeking.

The reason to focus on skills is that advancement often moves people from one job and job category to another. Or the economic landscape changes and you need to switch gears but not go back to school every time. Or there is a new field that emerges that you can slide into because you have those broad skills. So if you approach every class in the spirit of understanding what skill you are learning it will seem more purposeful. You could actually end up enjoying the subject matter along the way.

Once you have the right mindset you need to choose a major that both aligns with your goals and also will give you enjoyment. If you find that you don't like what you are studying and if it represents the field you want to enter, you may not have a good career fit. Stop there and regroup. You are also more likely to excel in a subject area you enjoy. Employers do not want to see GPAs much below 3.0. There are exceptions but they are looking for really smart people. If your back story is also a challenging one then the value of the higher GPA goes up even more. So if you are working and taking care of kids and getting a 3.4 GPA then you must be a very well-organized, focused and determined person. That is someone worth hiring.

Your family needs to understand that while you do this there will be sacrifices -- usually of adult returning studentyour time with them -- but they will all benefit in the end. Be sure to build family time into your weekly game plan. Friends can be supportive, but if they are not then you need to let those friends go. Those who are supportive will be the ones who encourage you when things get tough. Some of the best can be the new friends you make in college... maybe others like yourself. I have seen students volunteer to babysit for classmates' children when things were tight and papers due.

If you are working too then time management will be one of the most essential things you have to do. Your planner or diary will be your new best friend. The right school can also make that easier. Take one course to get your feet wet and assure this is the right fit if you have been away for a while. It will also help in getting back into a student frame of mind. Most universities now offer some mix of online and on site courses. Public universities and schools in urban centers are often more attuned to the needs of the adult learner. Community colleges can be excellent choices, as they are more flexible in scheduling and can offer courses specific to certain career goals. Some schools give credit for life experience or allow you to use your work as part of your learning experience. Many schools offer courses in the evenings or on weekends, or special programs designed for the working student. It is a challenging situation, for instance, when your curriculum requires lab time, which is not readily available other than in the daytime, when most of the faculty are present. But some schools now even offer labs on the weekend. But you have to do the research to find the ones that will work for you.

You obviously have to also do research to see where your money will be best spent. It would seem that some of the private online colleges would be best for adult learners but if you Google them you will see articles that suggest that they may be expensive and may not always deliver on what they advertise. I would suggest caution here. Be a smart consumer and be sure any school is accredited, does not have problems with the Better Business Bureau if it is a for-profit school, and delivers what it promises before you give them your money. Look at graduation rates and evidence regarding post-graduate employment. Look to your local state or city colleges and universities for the best return on your investment. Build up your savings now for books and any expenses not covered by financial aid. Sometimes your employer will have a tuition reimbursement plan. Sometimes private colleges will have scholarships that make them viable as long as the courses you need are offered at times you need them.

One of the things that will be important will be to network while in college. That is where the real career action is. Careers are built on relationships. This can take many forms. You will need to get to know your classmates. You can help and support each other. But also if others are adult learners too they may be good professional connections. Your faculty may know people in your field of interest but certainly will be good as references. So cultivate them. That helps your grades too. Get to know your deans or advisers as often opportunities come their way and it helps to be on their radar screens. One of my students recently found an internship through one of my undergraduate college connections and now has a job offer for after graduation.

If you can manage it, take part in some activity on or off campus that shows your heart, leadership and skills in a non-classroom context so you can enrich both your resume and your network. While it may take more time in your life it can also fast track your career.

The bottom line is that you can finish college whenever and wherever suits you best. Age is not a barrier. My best grad student assistant was 70 and some of the best undergrads I have known have been returners. One especially inspiring student was a widowed mother of two teens -- and she was blind. She graduated at the top of her class as a math major and went on to graduate work to become a math teacher.

You can do this.

Dr. Cantarella is the author of I CAN Finish College: The Overcome Any Obstacle and Get Your Degree Guide (www.icanfinishcollege.com) and a consultant on higher education, access and success. (mycantarella@icanfinishcollege.com) Information on finding the right college fit at any age can be found in Chapter 1 of I CAN Finish College For other valuable resources or to buy the book visit www.collegecountdown.com

Now, what if you could return to college, going full-time or part-time, at an affordable price, while you design your own degree -- the degree that most closely matches your own interests and goals -- working one-on-one with a faculty mentor? Sounds too good to be true, doesn't it? But it is. The City University of New York offers a university-wide individualized degree that allows you to do just that. Find out more by clicking this link:

See all the Benefits ofCUNY\u0026#39\u003Bs Individualized Degree

CUNY BA allows me to participate in the classes that are preparing me for my career. This is a program that allows you to build your dream future by designing your ultimate BA.
Galit Felner, Organizational Behavior ǀ Mentor: Prof. Yochi Cohen-Charash, Psychology, Baruch ǀ Home College: Baruch

If you found this article of interest, we think you'll also like 11 Tips for Financing Your College Degree

What do Whole Foods and CUNY BA Have in Common?

 

Well, of course, we are very different, in that Whole Foods is a grocery chain with  over 300 stores, 54,000+ employees and sales of about eight billion dollars a year. CUNY BA (shorthand for CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies) is a small academic program with 450 enrolled students and a staff of 11. But we have a lot in common when it comes to our values.

At Whole Foods, their motto is "Customers first." At CUNY BA, we believe in "Students first."

Whole Foods and CUNY BA2At Whole Foods, you can churn your own peanut butter, blend your own coffee beans, create your own granola combination. They are customer-centered. At CUNY BA, you can design your own degree. We are student-centered.

Whole Foods is also very responsive to their customers' requests. For instance, a few years ago, customers asked the company to procure more from local producers. They are now steadily increasing emphasis on local products and farms. When customers asked for more soda choices without artificial flavoring and color, Whole Foods stocked their shelves with those products.

Similarly, CUNY BA is very responsive to requests from our students, alumni and faculty mentors. Most recently, for example, a student and professor from Kingsborough Community College asked if CUNY BA would start allowing full-time faculty from the community colleges to be official mentors for CUNY BA students, as the program has always required that faculty mentors be selected from CUNY’s 11 four-year colleges. The proposal was discussed at the University Committee on the CUNY Baccalaureate (CUNY BA's governing body), and the change was immediately embraced and adopted. We are very excited to have more participation from CUNY's community college faculty and their students.

Based on feedback from alumni surveys about what kind of programming they'd like to see CUNY BA offer, we hosted a workshop last year called Improving Your Digital Self, to a packed audience. In response to requests from our students, we host workshops on applying to graduate school, writing the personal statement, and studying abroad every semInterdisciplinaryester.

At CUNY BA, we know all our students by name. That's actually pretty impressive at a university with over 250,000 students enrolled. Each CUNY BA student is assigned to a CUNY BA academic advisor who works closely with them through their CUNY BA career. We get to know each student individually and we respond to their needs. In fact, we are often proactive about that; for instance, we typically contact individual students directly when we learn about opportunities that we think match their interests.

We're not advocating that you shop in Whole Foods; NYC offers you many food shopping possibilities. We are struck, however, by our similar values and outcomes: We both offer increased choices with fewer restrictions. Whole Foods has satisfied shoppers; CUNY BA has fulfilled, successful graduates.

CUNY BA is the best place to design your own degree. We offer access to courses across the University; a comprehensive, upfront transfer evaluation; close collaboration with faculty mentors and academic advisors; learning that speaks directly to your own academic, personal and professional interests; the most affordable degree in New York.

Intrigued? Interested in putting your passion into a program? Learn more by receiving our exclusive "white paper," a two-page, colorful overview of this truly remarkable degree.

New Call\u002Dto\u002DAction

 

 

 

 

Seven Best Practices for Writing Your Personal Statement

 

The personal statement. It's something that is asked of you when applying to college, to graduate school, to scholarship and fellowship opportunities. For many, it can be a source of anxiety and lead to writer's block. But personal statements present an opportunity to show aspects of yourself that may not be developed in other areas of your application. So we've assembled tips we think will help unlock your potential for writing the best personal statement you can. We've also identified some things you should avoid.

7 Best Practices for Writing the Personal Statement.

     Answer the questions that are asked. If you are applying to several programs, grants or personal statementscholarships, you may find questions in each application that are somewhat similar. Don’t be tempted to use the same statement for all applications. It is important to answer each question being asked, and if slightly different answers are needed, you should write separate statements. In every case, be sure your answer fits the specific question being asked. Politicians might be able to get away with dodging questions, but this is not the place for that.

     Tell a story. Think in terms of showing or demonstrating through concrete experience. One of the worst things you can do is bore the admissions committee. If your statement is fresh, lively, and different, you’ll be putting yourself ahead of the pack. If you distinguish yourself through your story, you will make yourself memorable. And stories can be told in many different ways, they do not always have to be strictly chronological.

     Be specific. Your application should emerge as the logical conclusion to your story. For example, don’t state that you would make an excellent doctor unless you can back it up with specific reasons and evidence of your potential. In other words, your desire to become a lawyer, engineer, or whatever should be logical, the result of specific experience that is described in your statement.

     Find an angle. If you’re like most people, your life story may lack drama, so figuring out a way to make it interesting becomes the big challenge. Finding an angle or a “hook” is vital.

     Concentrate on your opening paragraph. The lead or opening paragraph is generally the most important. It is here that you grab the reader’s attention or lose it. This paragraph becomes the framework for the rest of the statement.

     Tell what you know. The middle section of your essay might detail your interest and experience in your particular field, as well as some of your knowledge of the field. Too many people graduate college with little or no knowledge of the nuts and bolts of the profession or field they hope to enter. So be as specific as possible in relating what you know about the field, and use the language that professionals use in conveying this information. Refer to experiences (work, research, etc.), classes, conversations with people in the field, books you’ve read, seminars you’ve attended, or any other source of specific information about the career you want, college you want, or scholarship you want and why you’re suited to it. Since you will have to select what to include in your statement, the choices you make are often an indication of your judgment.

     Write well and correctly. Be meticulous. Type and proofread your essay carefully. personal statement 5Have friends and/or teachers proofread it too. Many admissions officers say that command of correct use of language is important to them as they read these statements. Express yourself clearly and concisely. Adhere to stated word limits.

8 Things Not To Do.

     Don’t just write what you think the admissions or scholarship committee wants to hear. You are probably wrong, and such a response is likely to make you blend into the crowd rather than stand out from it.

      Avoid using empty, vague, over-used words like ‘meaningful’, ‘beautiful’, ‘challenging’, "very", ‘invaluable’, or ‘rewarding’.

     Don’t overwrite or belabor a minor point about yourself.

     Don’t repeat information directly from the application form itself, unless you use it to illustrate a point or want to develop it further.

     Don’t emphasize the negative or make excuses for yourself. Explain what you feel you need to, but emphasize the positive.

     Don’t try to be funny. You don’t want to take the risk that your readers won’t get the joke.

     Don’t get too personal about religion or politics -- unless you are treating these as integral to your life story as framed in a positive perspective. Avoid emotional catharsis.

     Don’t include footnotes.

*********************************************************************************************

Now that you have a better handle on writing the personal statement, let us introduce you to CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies. Commonly known as CUNY BA, we are the university-wide BA and BS degree at the City University of New York. A most important part of our application process is the personal statement. If you would like to learn more about becoming a student in this individualized degree, where you create your own major working with faculty mentors, click here. You'll see a list of the benefits of this degree, and you'll receive a set of emails that will advise you on how to apply.

 

See all the Benefits ofCUNY\u0026#39\u003Bs Individualized Degree

A 5-Step Guide to Applying to Graduate School

 

A 5-Step Guide to Applying to Graduate School

By Gerry Martini

So you have decided to go for a graduate degree? Both a “congratulations” and a “good luck” are in order! Graduate applications can sometimes be confusing, so let me take a few moments to see if I can ease your mind as you prepare for the process. Hopefully this 5-step guide will help you.

Step 1: Idepassionntify Your Passion

            Going to graduate school is not a step to be taken lightly—it takes plenty of time, effort, and (oftentimes) money to get through a program, so make sure that you really are passionate about what you want to study. I know it sounds cheesy to say “be passionate,” but you aren’t going to be as successful if you are spending all your time on a subject that you only have lukewarm feelings for; after a few months of non-stop study, you could become bitter that you are dedicating all of your time to something you don’t care enough about. So pick something you want to expend your energy on.

researching grad schoolStep 2: Research

            This is possibly the most difficult part of applying to graduate school (stop shaking your head at the screen—it’s true!). There are a lot of graduate programs out there, and probably quite a few of them in your area of interest, so give yourself time (at least a month—you don’t want to rush it) to look around so that you can find the best ones for you to apply to.

            By “best” I mean:

-        Is this the right kind of program for me (MA, PhD, JD, etc.)?

-        Are there faculty working in my area? For example, if you’re looking to get a PhD in English, don’t just look to see that schools have a PhD program; if you’re interested in 18th Century British Poetry, and most of their poetry scholars work on Contemporary American Poetry, it’s probably not the right place for you.

-        Will I be happy living here for 2-5 years (depending on the degree)? The academics of a school can be great, but you have to live there too.

-        What are the financial aid offerings (depending on the degree)? For PhDs this is especially important to pay attention to—sadly, for most master’s degree students your funding options are likely limited.

Do your research thoroughly. You can look at grad school guides (online or off); you can talk to your professors, college career services officers, and colleagues; you can visit campuses digitally and in person—take advantage of as many of these as you need to feel confident in the schools you will be applying to. And when you have further questions, take advantage of the schools’ friendly admissions officers (like me!) and/or professors who you might be interested in working with.

Step 3: Gather Materials for Applications

            Now, you might be saying “But Gerry, I haven’t actually started applying yet.” You’re absolutely correct: I’m suggesting that you start collecting supplemental materials for your applications well before you apply.

            Why? Because some materials take time to get together. If you have to have GRE scores, for example, you are should take the exam a few weeks (at the very latest) before the deadline in order to ensure your scores make it in time. You will need letters of recommendation, and I can guarantee you will get better results if you give your recommenders plenty of time to get them done (professors are busy people, many of whom procrastinate just as much as their students do during paper-writing season!). Even requesting transcripts takes time. Since most online applications can now be completed relatively quickly you might be able to get the actual application done at the last minute; however, the remainder of your documentation requires time.

college applicationsStep 4: Apply

            This should be the shortest part of the process. As I mentioned, most applications are online and take only an afternoon to complete because much of the information is going to be basic.

The piece of the application itself that will take a little longer is your applicant statement. This is your opportunity to present yourself to the admissions committee—make it count! If you have identified faculty members that you want to work with and/or an idea for your research, talk about these. Be especially sure to talk about why you think the program is right for you, and perhaps more importantly, why you feel you are perfect for the program.

Step 5: Wait

            This last step is the most terrifying aspect of applying to graduate school. But let me promise you that when a decision is made by the department, you will be notified very quickly. Just try and relax as much as possible.

 

            It’s the holiday season and so there are plenty of reasons to be stressed out. Follow these five steps and, hopefully, your graduate applications won’t be another one….

Gerry Martini is Admissions Coordinator at the Graduate Center, CUNY. You can contact him at: amartini@gc.cuny.edu or @TheGCGerry

Help! I've Changed My Mind, But My College Doesn't Have That Major!

 

Choosing the right college and getting accepted were major milestones for you. Now, you are there and taking courses in your chosen major...and it's just not working out. You are bored. Your grades are low, maybe even failing. The content of the major you picked is very different from what you expected. You only chose that major because you had to make a decision...or to please your parents. Or, perhaps you've become interested in a different subject thanks to an elective or general education course you took, an experience you had, or people you met. And thanks to those experiences, you are feeling much more interested and passionate about a whole new area of study.

change your majorBut now the major you know you want isn't offered at your college. What can you do?

Well, you might consider transferring to a college that does offer the major you want.

But what if you could stay right where you are and earn a degree in your new area of interest?

Many colleges offer students the opportunity to create their own academic paths. They might call it Ad Hoc Majors, Individualized Studies, Independent Majors, Interdisciplinary Majors, or Self-Designed Studies, but the idea is generally the same. These degree routes encourage motivated students to carve out their own academic curricula, usually working closely with faculty and special advisors. What's more, students in these individualized degree programs can usually select courses from not just one, but multiple disciplines. So, if you've become excited about an area such as, say, Political Psychology, or Musical Theater, and your school offers the individualized degree route, you are in luck. At large universities with multiple, separate schools (i.e., schools of health, eduation, arts, social work, etc.), individualized degree students can often choose courses that cut across those boundaries, as well.

Do you have what it takes?

You should expect that the individualized major will have it's own application process and criteria for admission. The required GPA may be higher than what was required for your current major. You might be expected to supply a letter of recommendation from a faculty member. You will probably have to submit a statement about what you want to study and what you expect to learn.

One student's story.

Emma was enrolled at Brooklyn College, one of the 11 four-year colleges at the City University of New York (CUNY); she was enrolled in Brooklyn's Journalism program, but that major wasn't satisfying her academic appetite. As an upper junior, she realized she really wanted to be making films. But not just any films - she wanted to somehow combine her passion for social justice with documentary filmmaking. Emma found out that CUNY offers an individualized degree route called CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies, commonly known as CUNY BA. She says, "CUNY BA has allowed me to explore my academic and intellectual interests in a way that works with my creative mind and independent nature. The major I created is 'Film through Sociological Research and Practice.' This allows me the freedom to learn about society through a sociological lens and use that knowledge when creating documentaries. I am achieving my goal of being a filmmaker through the classes I am taking, working on my own documentary, and gaining hands-on experience satisfied studentthrough internships. The courses in the film department at Brooklyn College are providing me with the knowledge I need in order to perform different tasks on professional movie sets. I also take sociology courses in order to better understand the world I capture on film. Throughout the year I make sure to work on different projects that give me the experience I need in order to turn my passion into a career. For the past two years, I have been continuously learning." To design her degree, Emma is working closely with her faculty mentor, Assistant Professor Sarah Christman, in the Film department at Brooklyn College. Prof. Christman is an award-winning, internationally-known filmmaker who makes non-fiction films that examine the intersection between people, technology and the natural world

Does Emma's story resonate with you? If you are a student enrolled in a CUNY college, or at another college that does not offer an individualized degree route, learn how to transfer to CUNY BA where you can design your own degree working closely with faculty mentors. Just click here:
See all the Benefits ofCUNY\u0026#39\u003Bs Individualized Degree


The Top Five Reasons for College Students to do Internships

 

If you're on the fence about whether or not to pursue an internship during college, the statistics alone should convince you to do one. Employers overwhelmingly point to internship experience as the most important factor they consider in hiring new college graduates for full-time positions. Research shows that 85 percent of companies use internships and similar experiential education programs to recruit for their full-time workforces.

In a recent survey from Marketplace and The Chronicle of Higher Education, employers said what matters most to them actually happens outside the classroom.

Internships came back as the most important thing that employers look for when evaluating a recent college graduate,” says Dan Berrett, senior reporter at the Chronicle. “More important than where they went to college, the major they pursued, and even their grade point average.”

Still unsure? Here are our top five reasons for taking on an internship while in college.

internships1)  Explore a career field of interest
Internships provide opportunities to experiment and pursue careers that match academic and personal interests. Well-planned and well-executed internships offer students a chance to gain first-hand knowledge of an organization and an industry, helping them focus their career goals and acquire valuable job skills and work experience which will bolster their resumes. By well-planned and well-executed, we mean you and the employer ensuring that your day-to-day tasks are fulfilling, helping you build your portfolio, teaching you new skills and helping you apply them, and introducing you to qualified people in your field. Sure, you’ll have some menial tasks, like fetching the coffee and doing the photocopying, but make sure you are meeting your professional development goals. It’s a good idea to agree upon your job responsibilities in advance with your supervisor and have that in writing; then, meet regularly with your supervisor to ensure that both of your expectations are being met. This is a good way for you to get feedback on your performance and help keep you on track with current and future assignments.

An internship is also an opportunity to exclude a career path you may have been considering should you find that the required work and the environment don’t live up to your expectations.

2) Develop and/or improve your general job preparation skills
Applying for an internship will require you to present a resume and to have an interview. Work with your college’s career development office to develop your resume and practice interviewing. An internship is also the right place to focus on and enhance your communication skills, both written and verbal. And if you are not adept at basic office technology such as Excel and PowerPoint, this is your opportunity to become proficient.

3)  Develop and/or improve the professional, marketable skills that will make you more competitive in the job market
Learn your strengths and weaknesses by creating learning objectives and receiving feedback from your supervisor. This is a unique learning opportunity that you may never have again as a working adult. Embrace the mistakes that you’ll make and the many things that you won’t know. Ask questions, observe, and take risks. This is your opportunity to gain exposure to real-world problems and issues not found in textbooks. It may also be your opportunity to work with equipment and technology that may not be available on campus. As you become more adept at the skills required in the internship, you’ll both gain more confidence and become a more attractive potential hire.

4)  Network with potential employment contacts
For better or worse, it’s all about who you know. As a student intern, you are surrounded bynetwork professionals in the industry that you are seeking access to. It’s more than just about getting a grade, earning credit, or making money. This is an opportunity to learn from everyone around you, ask questions, and impress them with your eagerness. These people can be your future colleagues or can be the connection to your first job. Get to know them. Take the opportunity to grill them with questions. What was their first job in the industry? What are the pros and cons of their profession? Do they have any contacts that might be useful for you? These people are insanely busy, but this shouldn’t intimidate you. Shoot them an email asking to schedule a time to sit down for coffee. Remember, they’re getting a lot from you, so you should be getting more than a résumé bullet point in return. At the end of experience, don’t forget to ask for a reference letter before you pack up your desk and hit the door.

5)  Earn academic credit
The decision to grant academic credit for participating in an internship is typically determined by an appropriate academic department usually in one’s major or minor. Some degree programs incorporate a work opportunity into a requirement for graduation by giving course credit for the work experience. Other programs have an internship as an elective course for credit. Contact your academic advisor for more information because earning credit varies by departments. In this way, you’ll be making degree progress while preparing for a career after you graduate. 

The bottom line? Most companies look for real world experience when hiring and the best way to get that experience is through an internship. Despite the low pay – or no pay -- internships are worth it in the long run if you want to figure out your future, build your resume, and get your foot in the door.

At the City University of New York, there is an individualized undergrad degree program with a flexible structure that helps you apply your internship credits toward your degree. This is one of many advantages a university-wide, individualized degree program can offer you. Find out more about CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies here:
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Who is CUNY BA's Rebel of the Week? Oct 7, 2013

 

Be A Rebel With a Cause

CUNY BA’s Rebel of the Week

We typically think of rebels as people who refuse allegiance to, resist or rise up in arms against their governments. But a rebel can be any person who upholds his or her own opinions. A true rebel stands up for what he or she believes is right, not against what's right. It's about being an individual and refusing to follow a crowd or let the majority force you to think and act the same way they do, even if that means taking the road less traveled. True rebels know who they are and do not compromise their individuality. Rebels are often trendsetters, innovators, trailblazers, thought leaders, change-agents.

CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies (CUNY BA) is the individualized, university-wide Bachelor’s degree at the City University of New York. Each student designs his or her own major in collaboration with at least one full-time CUNY faculty mentor. This is CUNY’s most innovative and flexible degree where students have access to courses across the entire university and they take on a major share of the responsibility for planning and carrying out their studies.

Because many of our students are designing their own degrees, often in new and emerging fields such as Digital Humanities, Sustainable Agriculture, Human Trafficking, Game Design, Synthetic Biology, Cyber Security, and Emergency Management Planning, we’ve come to think of them as rebels, in the very best sense of the word. Accordingly, we’d like to tip our hat to other rebels who have come before them.

This week’s Rebel of the Week is Dr. Mark Showalter.

Planetary astronomer Mark Showalter is rabid about rings. While everyone knows that Saturn has a spectacular ring system, it’s often forgotten that Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune are also encircled by rings, albeit ones that are fainter and narrower. Each of these systems interacts closely with a family of small, inner moons. Dr. Showalter works on some of NASA’s highest-profile missions to the outer planets, including Cassini, now orbiting Saturn, and New Horizons, which flew past Jupiter en route to its 2015 encounter with Pluto. Known for his persistence in planetary image analysis, his work on the earlier Voyager mission led to his discovery of Jupiter’s faint, outer “gossamer” rings and Saturn’s tiny ring-moon, Pan.

Dr. Showalter was recently granted three more years to study the system of rings and moons orbiting Uranus with the Hubble Space Telescope. Then, this summer, he discovered a new moon orbiting Neptune.

Designated S/2004 N 1, the Neptune moon was previously overlooked by astronomers due to its small size and the speed at which the tiny body orbits the planet -- one time every 23 hours. The finding makes S/2004 N 1 the 14th known moon of Neptune and the smallest, estimated to be just 14 miles across. It is so small and so dim, that it's about 100 million times fainter than the faintest star that can be seen with the naked eye -- a body so miniscule that it escaped even the eagle eyes of NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew past Neptune in 1989, surveying the planet's system of moons and rings.

The discovery is significant since astronomers studying Neptune's moons previously thought that the smallest moons orbit closer to the planet. Tiny S/2004 N 1, however, is located between Neptune's second- and third-largest moons.

RebelUsing a method similar to one often employed by action photographers, Dr. Showalter’s intuition, creativity and doggedness led him to discover the moon, a tiny, white dot about 65,400 miles from Neptune, in Hubble images taken between 2004 and 2009.

"The moons and arcs orbit very quickly, so we had to devise a way to follow their motion in order to bring out the details of the system," he said in a statement released by NASA. "It's the same reason a sports photographer tracks a running athlete -- the athlete stays in focus, but the background blurs. The procedure I devised predicts where any given moon ought to move from one image to the next, and then combines the images with a ‘twist’ that compensates for the expected motion. It was only when I expanded my analysis out to regions well beyond Neptune’s ring system that an extra little dot turned up, over and over again. In less than a week, we went from our first detection to ten.”

In addition to helping to discover Saturn’s moon Pan, Dr. Showalter discovered Mab and Cupid, two moons of Uranus (and got to name them, after two Shakespeare characters); and Styx and Kerberos, two moons of Pluto. The images he used for his latest discovery have been in the public domain for years, so "anyone could have discovered this," he says. But nobody else did until this astronomer, armed with curiosity and persistence, saw the tiny, white dot.

Dr. Showalter has been leading a team of astronomers studying rings and moons since 2002. For the next few years, he hopes that this work will illuminate the subtle interactions at play within a dense pack of moons and rings that circle Uranus. The system shows signs of chaotic motion, which means that the orbits are slightly unpredictable and collisions between moons can occur on time scales as short as one million years. That may sound like a long time, but it is astonishingly short for a system that is more than 4 billion years old.

We salute Mark Showalter as a rebel for the tenacity he brings to space exploration and for helping us understand the cosmos more with each new discovery he makes.

You Can Be A Rebel With a Cause, Too!Find out how to design your own degree in NYC.

Why Study Abroad? Five Reasons to Do It.

 

Have you considered studying abroad, but aren’t not sure it's worth your time and money? If you ask anybody who has done it, they’ll tell you that it is a life-changing experience and one of the most rewarding things they’ve ever done.

1. Study abroad is the optimal way to learn a language. There is no better and more effective way to learn a language than to be immersed in it. On a study abroad trip you're surrounded by the language on a daily basis and are seeing and hearing it in its cultural context. Language learning happens most quickly under these circumstances. Moreover, many American colleges are scaling back their language programs; even when they are not, it can be hard to find advanced courses in languages not commonly offered, like Japanese, Arabic, Russian, Portuguese and Chinese, to name a few.why study abroad?

2. Study abroad allows you get to know another culture first-hand. Cultural differences are more than just differences in language, food, and appearances. A person's culture reflects very deep perceptions, beliefs, values and habits that influence his or her way of life and the way that s/he views the world. Students who experience cultural differences personally gain a deeper, practical understanding of them.

3. Study abroad will help you develop skills and give you experiences a classroom setting can never provide. Being immersed in an entirely new setting is scary at first, but it's also exciting. It's an opportunity to discover new strengths and abilities, conquer new challenges and solve new problems. You'll encounter situations that are wholly unfamiliar to you and will learn to adapt and respond in effective ways. You’ll also make new friends, those native to the country, as well as other students who have come to study there like yourself.

4. Study abroad provides the opportunity to travel. Weekends and academic breaks allow you to venture out and explore your surroundings - both those nearby and those further away. Some more structured study abroad programs even have organized field trips planned in or around the curriculum.

5. Study abroad enhances employment opportunities and enhances the value of your degree. Did you know that only 4% of U.S. undergraduates ever study abroad? Yet, the world continues to become more globalized. American countries are increasingly investing dollars abroad, and companies from countries around the world continue to invest in the international market. Through an employer's eyes, a student who has studied abroad is self-motivated, independent, willing to embrace challenges, and able to cope with diverse situations. Your experience living and studying in a another country, negotiating another culture, and acquiring another language will all set you apart from the majority of other job applicants. Your employment options will expand exponentially.

Now, if you are interested in study abroad, you'll want to make sure your college will accept the credits you earn there. Large universities often have their own study abroad programs, but even small colleges are interested in helping their students studying abroad.

At the City University of New York, our individualized degree is committed to helping our students study in far away lands. CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies not only readily accepts credits earned in study abroad, we apply them directly to our degree requirements. We've had students study abroad all around the world, from Costa Rica to Qatar, from Nepal to Nicaragua. And, because we are committed to helping our students gain this experience, we host study abroad workshops every semester. Our workshops help you decide not only where to study, but how to secure funding for it. We offer special guidance on applying for programs such as the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship and the U.S. State Department Critical Language Scholarship. So we encourage you to consider designing your own degree at CUNY and include study abroad as part of your plan.

The support you'll get for study abroad and the ease of applying study abroad credits to your degree are just a two of the advantages of CUNY BA. Interested in learning more? Click this link:

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